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Reading Title Commitments For Better Closings

Q: What is the most common mistake Realtors (and FSBO parties) make in reviewing a title insurance commitment?

A: They don’t review or read it at all!

Most Realtors are trained not to act as attorney’s or give any legal advice. The Title Commitment is a legal document and advising a client on it could constitute legal advice. In addition, many Realtors and FSBO parties simply don’t know what to look for and, therefore, don’t read the document.

Title Commitments Provide Critical Information

All Realtors should be reviewing the title commitment for certain, important information. A title commitment has three sections or schedules: Schedule A, Schedule B-I Requirements, and Schedule B-II Exceptions. At a minimum, Realtors should be reviewing the following:

Schedule A

The first part of the title commitment provides the names of the proposed insured. This should be your buyers. If it is not, call the title company right away – they might be missing an Amendment or their might be an error in your paperwork.

The Policy Amount should match your purchase price.

The name of the seller should be listed in paragraph 3 as the “fee simple” owner. If the name is different, there may be a title issue such as a deceased individual or spouse that still owns the property, a trust or LLC that has an interest in the property, or some other issue that requires attention.

The land referred to in the policy should match the land being sold. It will be a legal description, not a postal address. Review to make sure it looks right, especially if the property is a Condominium or includes multiple lots.

Schedule B-I Requirements

This portion of the title commitment provides a list of requirements that must be met in order to close. The requirements will call out any unusual issues that must be dealt with at closing. For instance, if the seller is deceased, the Requirements might require a valid Personal Representative to be appointed to sign on behalf of the estate.

In addition, most title companies will include any loan payoffs, taxes, or other liens that must be paid at closing. Some title companies, however, will show those liens in Schedule B-II.

Schedule B-II Exceptions

This section shows all of the title “issues” that are excepted from coverage – in other words, the title company will not insure for these issues. They are usually things like covenants, restrictions and easements. But, at some title companies, seller mortgages and liens will appear in this section. Therefore, it is important to review.

Reviewing is not Advising

Although Realtors should review the title commitment, they should not advise their clients about the legal meaning and effect of this document. That would constitute legal advice and is prohibited under Wisconsin Law. Nevertheless, if the Realtor spots a problem (the wrong seller or buyer or too many Mortgages), that should be brought to the client’s attention with the advice to seek legal counsel.

The title commitment is a critical document that provides all parties and their agents with notice of the current state of title. While Realtors should not make a “legal” review of this document, they should make a thorough review to avoid any closing problems.

 

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